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Tips for Work and Life with Andrew LaCivita

Career expert, motivator, and award-winning author Andrew LaCivita shares insights on leading a fulfilled life.
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Jun 23, 2016

Have you ever wondered if I would have only known then what I know now? It makes no difference who you are, this has happened to you. It’s happened to me. No one escapes this feeling at some point. Join career expert, motivator, and award-winning author Andrew LaCivita as he discusses how to ask brilliant questions to make smart decisions! 

Any time you’ve made a poor decision, at least one of two things was wrong. You either had a faulty decision-making process or you didn’t have accurate or complete information.

Anytime you’re asking questions (in a job interview or questioning someone as it relates to business), you can prepare yourself by first asking three questions:

  • What do I want to know and why is it important to me?
  • How will I ask it?
  • How and when will I use the information?

What do I want to know and why do I want to know it?

Your whys are such great places to start because that’s what you care about! Why would start in any other place?

How will I ask it?

Adding your rationale at the end is the key to getting the insight you want as quickly as you can possibly get it. The sooner you get the information you need, the more time you create to ask additional questions.

How and when will I use the information?

Any question you ask that yields information you can immediately use to sell yourself or make a decision is short-term.

Any question you ask that yields information you’ll ponder is long-term.

It comes down to:

  • The quantity of your inventory of questions (What will I ask?)
  • The quality of your inventory of questions and their alignment to your needs (Why is that important to me?)
  • Their structure and effectiveness in yielding the information you want as opposed to what the other party thinks you want (How will I ask it?)
  • The benefit of knowing the information (How will I use the information?)
  • When you will use the information (When will I use it to make a determination?)

For a complete summary, detailed "transcript," fun quote cards and more related to this podcast episode, visit:

http://milewalk.com/mwblog/ask-brilliant-questions-make-smart-decisions/

If you enjoyed this episode, please comment and share!

Thanks!

Andy

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